Restore public info & media rights to post-2015 agenda

Commitments to greater media freedom and public access to information have been cut from a draft pact on post-2015 global development, barely days after campaigners had been told they had successfully won a place for them in the text. As the pact’s drafters reconvene this week and next, they face calls to restore the cut … More Restore public info & media rights to post-2015 agenda

Ten ‘most obvious business models’ for news now & in the future

After listing today’s staples, (1) advertising and (2) subscriptions, Marc Andreessen continued with (3) premium content (that is, “a paid tier on top of a free, ad-supported one”); (4) conferences and events; (5) cross-media (meaning that your news operation also generates books, movies, and the like); (6) crowd-funding; (7) micropayments, using Bitcoin; and (8) philanthropy. Nicholas Thompson, the editor of The New Yorker’s Web site and a co-founder of The Atavist, chimed in with two more: (9) “while building product you’re passionate about, create software you then license widely!”—The Atavist’s approach—and (10) “fund investigative business stories + then short stocks before publishing” … More Ten ‘most obvious business models’ for news now & in the future

An outsider’s view of media ‘morality’

From what I’ve read, journalism tends to sort of have this strong moral foundation to it, in a sense that it’s a very important institution in a democracy. Keeping people informed is its duty. … But people have grown to neglect that a bit or not appreciate it as much, so now the industry is sort of flailing, or withering a bit. … More An outsider’s view of media ‘morality’

Online rights can be defended by new international law

The European Commission’s newly released statement on Europe’s role in shaping the future of the net (PDF) also opposes ‘new global legal instruments’ – a stance which could unnecessarily limit efforts to tackle large-scale Internet surveillance and a loss of public trust in the way the Internet is managed and run. … More Online rights can be defended by new international law

The dysfunctional co-dependence of old and new media

“It helps to envision modern journalism as a kind of video game. If you’re part of the Internet media, everything you put out into the world comes with its own scoring system. Tweets are counted by retweets and favorites, stories are scored by page views and Facebook likes. A writer’s reach and influence is visible right there, in the number of his followers and the number of “influencers” who subscribe to his or her feed. If you’re wondering why so many writers and journalists from such divergent backgrounds would feel the need to instantly tweet out unconfirmed information to their followers, all you have to do is think of the modern Internet reporter as some form of super Redditor — to be silent is to lose points. To be retweeted is to gain them. We do it for the ‘karma’.” … More The dysfunctional co-dependence of old and new media